Journal
 

Monday, May 22, 2006

All Men Are Sisters

My schedule for this weekend's upcoming Plausfab Wisconsin:

Two Different Species? (Science and Technology)
Friday, 10:00-11:15 a.m. in Senate A
If men are from Mars and women are from Venus, does that mean we’re all aliens? Hear from proponents and debunkers of the newest wave of a very old theory that holds that men can’t understand women and vice versa. What is the current state of research on la difference in psychology, neurology, genetics, biomechanics? Who is trying to untangle the nature/nurture Gordian knot?
with Linda McAllister, Aaron Lichtov

Conveying the Post–Human in Humanist Terms (Writing SF&F: The Craft)
Saturday, 1:00-2:15 p.m. Saturday, 1:00-2:15 p.m. in Senate A
How can writers better render characters who exist in far–flung places and times to readers of our own times? How can they render them in some way sympathetically and understandably? If "human nature" is, for the purposes of a particular sfnal work, imagined differently, reinterpreted, or done away with altogether, how do you do it without losing the interest of potential readers? How without simply transporting 20th/21st century characters into a futuristic milieu?
with Janine Ellen Young, Jennifer Pelland, Eileen Gunn, Carol F. Emshwiller, Richard J. Chwedyk

New Wave Fabulists (Reading Group) (Readings)
Sunday, 10:00-11:15 a.m. Sunday, 10:00-11:15 a.m. in Conference Room 2
Benjamin Micah Rosenbaum, Matt Ruff, Tom La Farge and Wendy Walker read from their work.

Knitting for Boys (Feminism, Sex, and Gender)
Sunday, 4:00-5:15 p.m. Sunday, 4:00-5:15 p.m. in Conference Room 5
We had a fascinating discussion on the crafty craze on Susan Groppi's blog a while back. Why are so many women returning now to the knitting needles? And, if knitting is so darn cool, why so few men? Mary Anne volunteered to teach any boys who want to to crochet at WisCon; Susan offered to teach us to knit, too. I want to learn! And, perhaps, what better context for a low-key, convivial discussion of craftiness, the DIY ethic, feminism, this generation's return to things abandoned, what girls like to do and what boys like to do and out of what mechanisms these likes arise, and whatever else comes into our pretty little heads....
with judy [judith] s. Peterson, Joseph Murphy, Jason Erik Lundberg, Jessica C. Adams

The SignOut (Events)
Monday, 11:30am-12:45pm Monday, 11:30am-12:45pm in Wis/Cap
Come and sign your works, come and get things signed, come and hang out and wind down before you leave.
with everybody and her sister.

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Tuesday, May 9, 2006

Machine Transation Blog Meme

1. Take a story or blog entry you wrote, or a few paragraphs thereof.

2. Pop it through as many Google Translate round trips as you feel like. I did them all, in order. Feel free to de-translate words that get marooned, if you know the language, so that you can, for instance, turn "himmlischen" back into "heavenly".

3. Clean it up. You may change paragraphing, punctuation, and parts of speech (tense, case, person, and number) and add (but not subtract) the words "the", "a", "an", "is", "and", "it", "of", "in", "for", "but", and "or".

4. Post and enjoy.

The Orange

by Benjamin Rosenbaum and Google Translate


This world's orange silence is never schemed -- it's unique, in unexpected police; and the simple method is to wear.

All security issues, which are orange; the possibility of the pipeline tickets, printed work-style at the same time. This is to enhance display.

The Fęz discussions, the answers, are moderate to excellent, and it is in the mail, in the internals -- different orange tractors, birds, the pleasant, one man... according to you. In this song thing... because of the engine response, and the tractors.

Who has been shrouded in visitors? Over Orange, WorldCom, and the possibility of improved research methods and interpretation for aircraft?

To establish quality, one thing is a simple way -- the wide spaces.

You fear the Indian style of writing, and to ensure passengers. Installation and periodic adjustments, back from holiday, to explain the answer. In summer, in the rear gesture, this Lama-Darai Orange -- that it lives in some one!

From research and standards for, the Orange: "an unyielding spirit" is "the choice of which function".

When you work in a seasonal benchmark, it must be time.

Accelerated: India, and your work style. Rigulaturs shouted, "the jury is painful experience!" Which you are, in different places, Orange. For example -- the orange and the world. But it is improving.

"My friends will be in the Ohio National."

"This is like it! In the cold of winter, the lake is the center of Chicago, and of community spirit, and of statistics."

Orange is consistent with the high security of many seats, and of some drug injections, to absorb the spirit. And the choice of the ring was for it, but it withdrew in Parliament, and removed Syey from Big Chicago.

Their names, and a sprite traffic distribution of barrier removal teams, nationwide, are a system of data, and the return to the results of punishment. To comply with the U.S. standards, Ęve's Eastern Time Veterinary Reference is into communication differences.

The kind of man for it -- when gold-burdened teenage lesbians, who approach to soak old agricultural people, are to improve the orange! A large number of orders in 39 days, and I am on Saviwai Hill third.

The world and fruit! Rotary International!

And about a basket, professor, at the university, in the third standard? "With the passage of time."

"They went out to eat," you said today.

The remaining time, from a country.

(Maybe the rules are too restrictive? Would it be more interesting to be able to then cut up to half the words, and perhaps to add any words up to three letters long?)

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Monday, May 8, 2006

only look fondly Slave worms in her flashing

Someone named HusyFantasy has apparently done a Chinese translation of "Embracing-the-New".

Google's take is pretty funkadelic, though for some reason the URL-based Google translation gives up half way and reverts to Chinese (maybe some clever Javascript that the spider can't get past?)

Pasting the Chinese into the text-based Google Translate yields the full text. I particularly like this, from the ending:

He needs only one God, God is a need to rally him. But he was unable to figure Yuet U.S. diplomatic goddess. He had betrayed her. He thought the embrace new God, the real God embrace new, denied that the wife and children Slave worms catch, the hand stretched out toward hope....

Remember.

One beast standing in the courtyard. Wind is cool and the forests that spring up like the taste. Where hunting was about to start.

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Thursday, May 4, 2006

HOWTO Not Undermine Each Other In Front Of The Kids

Update: I neglected to mention that this is, obviously, an expansion pack for the well-known collectible card game, "Frantic: The Parenting"...

If you'll pardon a few things, dear readers -- a perhaps overly firm and hortatory tone, sweeping generalizations from my own experience, references to "your kids" when you might not have any -- I have a handy HOWTO to offer you. This might be most useful if you are me, or, failing that, if you are raising small children with some kind of partner and collaborator. Caveat lector.


I don't think it's so bad to fight in front of your kids. Whether your fighting style is WASPish reticence, Californian I-feel-when-you-because, or Mediterannean shouts and door-slammings, as long as you don't lose sight of basic mutual love and respect, as long as you try to fight towards and not against each other, you are probably teaching useful skills; and you are at least being real. It's a fine line; I find that if I try to be totally sweet and in solidarity with Esther all the time in front of our younguns, even when I'm angry, it only makes the anger linger longer.

But I think there are two sorts of fights you don't really want to have in front of your kids. One is the fight where you are too cranky, upset, or hurt to fight responsibly; I'll leave it to you, readers, to determine your own limits here. The other is a fight about the kids themselves.

Parents fight about childrearing in front of kids a lot; it's hard not to. The kids are always underfoot, and the raising of them so important -- it's hard to wait for a nap or a babysitter to address your concerns. I too, dear reader, was often in this benighted condition, before I discovered this handy HOWTO. Even though you know it dilutes and debases your shared authority, even though you know it can make the kids deeply uneasy, even though, indeed, it's just plain rude (you wouldn't fight about your mutual adult friend Fred in front of Fred, and the kids have at least as much claim upon your courtesy), it's hard not to roll your eyes at a piece of overprotectiveness, to stick up sharply for the little one when the other parent is having their own tantrum -- or contrariwise, to jump in when murder is being gotten away with. And sometimes, indeed, it is problematic to say nothing at all -- sometimes intercession, or a different perspective, or a reminder, is important when Dearest Childcare Collaborator is, say, locked into a poorly chosen struggle. The problem is that weighing in verbally usually does more harm than good.

We keep these cards in the kitchen drawer and the glove compartment of the car. You'll notice they are mostly negative; they're the things you *don't* want to say aloud. If you strive to present a united front, parenting in collaboration is a little like improv theater -- if you are opening your mouth to say "No, you can't have another slice", and sweetie gets "yes" out first, you need to be able to follow up "No --" with " -- problem." The cards, though, mean you have a second channel of communication.

There are times, of course, when a freewheeling family debate is perfectly appropriate; there are other times when sweetie is handling things and you're well advised stay out of it entirely. In between these times, though, when you are trying and failing to button your intrusive lip, here's hoping the marvelous Parenting Backchannel Cards preserve the peace of your familial encampment.

  • Please watch out for:

    CAVING IN

    I think you should hold the line

  • Please watch out for:

    A DISAPPROVING TONE

    You're being very hard on the kids

  • Please watch out for:

    AN UNFRIENDLY OR CRANKY TONE

    with me

  • Please watch out for:

    UNNECESSARY DRAMA

    It erodes parental authority

  • Please watch out for:

    DISTRACTING

    We'll be late

  • Please watch out for:

    UNDERMINING

    I'm handling this one

  • Hey

    SORRY

    About that thing before

  • Please watch out for:

    CAVING IN

    I think you should hold the line

  • Please watch out for:

    A DISAPPROVING TONE

    You're being very hard on the kids

  • Please watch out for:

    AN UNFRIENDLY OR CRANKY TONE

    with me

  • Please watch out for:

    UNNECESSARY DRAMA

    It erodes parental authority

  • Please watch out for:

    DISTRACTING

    We'll be late

  • Please watch out for:

    UNDERMINING

    I'm handling this one

  • Hey

    SORRY

    About that thing before

(Now that Aviva has broken our sophisticated encryption mechanism (that is, learned to read), I don't know how much longer this will work; unless, out of sheer politeness, she refrains from reading the notes we pass in class.)

Anyway, dear readers, let me know how it goes (and also let me know how this post displays on your browser of choice; I am dipping my toe in the Pool of Fancy CSS).

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